Changes in the Fifth Month of Pregnancy

by Patricia Hughes

The fetus continues to develop at an amazing pace. The internal organs are formed and continue to mature. The muscles are developing this month. The baby’s movements and kicking are good for this development. The baby turns from side to side. He may switch from head up to head down positions frequently.

The pads of the fingers and toes are developing. Your baby’s unique fingerprints are forming this month as well. The baby teeth are forming in the gums. The facial features continue to develop this month. The eyelashes and eyebrows are beginning to grow. The baby’s gender is now visible on the ultrasound. If the baby is a girl, her eggs are forming inside her ovaries.

The baby’s skin is red and wrinkled. The baby is tiny, but is really looking human now. The fetus is also staring to act like a new baby. He will startle at loud sounds outside the uterus. He is beginning to have regular cycles of sleeping and staying awake. By the end of the month the baby weighs about ten ounces and is nine inches long.

You may continue to feel energetic this month. Morning sickness has disappeared for the majority of women. Your belly is starting to look pregnant. If you felt too sick to exercise in early pregnancy, you may decide to start now. Always talk to your doctor before beginning any exercise program.

Find something that is low impact and that you enjoy. Take a walk after dinner every night. A prenatal yoga class can be relaxing as well as healthy. Some of the positions and breathing used in yoga may be helpful in labor as well. Swimming is another good choice for pregnant women. The natural buoyancy in the water helps relieve pressure in later pregnancy. Swimming also works the muscles and is a cardio work out.

You have probably been thinking more about the day when your baby is born. You may be forming definite opinions about the birth experience you want for you and your baby. Consider writing a birth plan to spell out your wishes during labor.

Some things included on a birth plan include information on how you want to labor, the atmosphere in the room, fetal monitoring, IV fluids and pain relief. Include information about what you want in each of these areas. Keep in mind that some things can happen that limit your choices. If a potential problem is detected with intermittent monitoring, continuous monitoring may be needed.

Consider the time just after the baby is born. What do you want to happen? Who will cut the cord? This is usually the father or the doctor. Ask your partner how he feels about cutting the cord. Do you want the baby placed on your abdomen after the birth? If you plan to breastfeed, include information on the birth plan. Ideally, the baby should have time at the breast within the first thirty minutes after birth.

A variety of procedures may be done to the baby. This varies from state to state. A common procedure is to put antibiotic eye drops in the baby’s eyes soon after birth. Vitamin K shots are also common. These are used in case the baby has a problem with blood clotting. In some cases, these can be delayed a short time to allow the parents to bond with the baby. The drops make the baby’s vision blurry and some parents want time to gaze into the baby’s eyes before the drops are given.

Think about what you want in your birth plan. If you have any questions, be sure to ask the doctor at your check up. For example, if you are considering fetal monitoring options, ask the doctor for his thoughts. A few good questions can tell you a lot about how supportive the doctor will be regarding your choices.

Don't forget to check out our next article. The 6th Month of Pregnancy

Biography
Patricia Hughes is a freelance writer and mother of four. Patricia has a Bachelor’s Degree in Elementary Education from Florida Atlantic University. She has written extensively on pregnancy, childbirth, parenting and breastfeeding. In addition, she has written about home décor and travel.

No part of this article may be copied or reproduced in any form without the express permission of More4Kids Inc © and All Rights Reserved

Related Posts with Thumbnails
  • Share/Bookmark

Leave a Comment

Fields marked by an asterisk (*) are required.